Cryptogram Puzzles
Vols 1 and 2

Cryptogram
Puzzles

Vols 1 and 2

Welcome to Cryptogram Puzzles!

On this page, you'll find two Cryptogram large print puzzle books. The aim? Keep your brain busy with these challenging puzzles. Volumes 1 and 2.


200 Large Print Cryptogram Puzzles by Bored Boomers:
Crack the Codes and Keep Your Brain Busy

Don’t become a Bored Boomer… Treat yourself to our all-new Large Print Code-Cracking puzzles containing 200 Cryptograms. If you’re wanting to keep your memory sharp and wear glasses, we’ve got you covered with large print puzzles. No more squinting.

Read the history lesson behind WWII ciphers (shown below the two book covers). Then go grab a pencil, find a comfy chair… and have hours of fun deciphering these great cryptogram quotes!

PS—At the back of our book, we want you to tear out a page. Why? We’ve included a Bored Boomer Bookmark so you can easily keep track of where you are—so you won’t lose your place! It’s our gift to you.

The book is a “just right” 7” x 10” comfy size. While you get one for yourself, don’t forget your friends who’d love their own copy too.

200 Cryptogram Puzzles – Vol. 1

200 Cryptogram Puzzles large print - Vol 1

200 Cryptogram Puzzles – Vol. 2

200 Cryptogram Puzzles large print - Vol 2

Cryptography History

Cryptography was used extensively during World War II, with a plethora of code and cipher systems fielded by the nations involved. In addition, the theoretical and practical aspects of cryptanalysis, or code-breaking, were much advanced.

Probably the most important code-breaking event of the war was the successful decryption by the Allies of the German "Enigma" Cipher. Poland achieved the first complete break into Enigma around 1932. They passed the techniques and insights used to the French and British Allies just before the outbreak of the war in 1939. British efforts at the Bletchley Park research station substantially improved them during the war.

Decryption of the Enigma Cipher allowed the Allies to read important parts of German radio traffic on important networks and was an invaluable source of military intelligence throughout the war. Intelligence from this source (and other high-level sources, including the Fish ciphers) was eventually called Ultra.

A similar break into the most secure Japanese diplomatic cipher, designated Purple by the US Army Signals Intelligence Service, started before the US entered the war. Product from this source was called Magic. 

[VIEW ORIGINAL SOURCE HERE: Wikipedia]

Message from Susan about Cryptogram Puzzles:

“I absolutely LOVE solving Cryptogram puzzles. Every night I solve a puzzle. Funny thing is: it relaxes me. You'd think solving puzzles would keep you awake, right?!”

In Cryptogram puzzles, the words have their letters substituted with other letters in a code that remains the same for that puzzle set. For example, every A might be a T, every E might be a W, and so on. The letter substitution is consistent in each individual puzzle.

Check out our Cryptogram SPECIAL MIX puzzle books  HERE

Cryptogram SPECIAL MIX, volume 1

“I absolutely LOVE solving Cryptogram puzzles. Every night I solve a puzzle. Funny thing is: it relaxes me. You'd think solving puzzles would keep you awake, right?!”

In Cryptogram puzzles, the words have their letters substituted with other letters in a code that remains the same for that puzzle set. For example, every A might be a T, every E might be a W, and so on. The letter substitution is consistent in each individual puzzle.

Cryptogram SPECIAL MIX, volume 1

Check out our Cryptogram SPECIAL MIX puzzle books  HERE